Questions and answers

​​​​​Please check this web page regularly as importa​nt information may be updated periodically.

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1. How much funding is available?

Approximately $10 million is initially available under the Control tools and technologies for established pest animals and weeds programme to fund projects across multiple years, from 2016–17 to 2018–19.

2. Who is eligible to apply for funding?

To be eligible, you must be one of the following:

  1. An Australian company or organisation with a valid Australian Business Number or Australian Company Number and that is capable of entering into a legally binding and enforceable deed with the Commonwealth. It is envisaged that companies or organisations should have a demonstrated research and development capability.

    or

  2. An Australian resident with a valid Australian Tax File Number, who is applying with one of the eligible Australian companies or organisations specified above, as a confirmed primary project partner. The primary project partner is required to provide cash or in-kind contribution. There is no specified limit for the contribution.

Refer to the programme guidelines for more information on eligibility requirements.

3. How much funding can I apply for?

There is no limit on the amount of funding you can request per project. However, as the programme aims to support the development of control tools and technologies, we expect that applications are for projects of a reasonable scale, and seek at least $200 000 per project.

4. When do applications close?

Applications must be submitted to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources by 5pm AEST, Monday 23 January 2017.

5. Do I need a partner to apply?

If you are applying as an individual you must have a primary project partner who is an eligible company or organisation. While it is not mandatory to apply as a partnership, it is highly encouraged. Please refer to the programme guidelines for more information.

6. Can I apply for funding for more than one project?

Yes. You must submit a separate application for each project.

7. Is funding limited to certain agricultural industries?

No. The targeted pest animal or weed can have an impact on one or more agricultural industries, excluding forestry and fisheries.

Your project should propose to develop a new or improved control tool or technology to target one or more established pest animals (excluding invertebrates) and/or weeds that have a national impact on Australian agricultural productivity and profitability. The targeted pest animal or weed must not be native to Australia or a particular part of Australia, and must also pose a threat to ecosystems, habitats or native species in their natural surroundings in Australia.

See the programme guidelines for more information on eligibility, our assessment criteria and the competitive grant process.

8. What type of control tools and technologies will this programme support?

To be eligible, a project must focus on the development of a biological, chemical or physical control tool or technology that is either new or improved, compared to alternative options.

Refer to the programme guidelines for detailed eligibility and assessment criteria, and to check our definition of a ‘new’ and ‘improved’ control tool or technology.

9. Is funding limited to particular pest animals and/or weeds?

To be eligible, a project must focus on developing a control tool or technology that is for managing one or more established pest animal(s) (excluding invertebrates) and/or weed(s) that:

  • are not native to Australia or a particular part of Australia
  • pose a threat to ecosystems, habitats, or native species in their natural surroundings in Australia
  • have a national impact on reducing Australian agricultural productivity and profitability.

Projects that target invertebrates are not eligible for funding.

Refer to the programme guidelines for detailed eligibility and assessment criteria and to check our definition of an ‘established’ pest animal or weed and ‘native species in natural surroundings’.

10. Are projects that target native wildlife eligible?

No. The management of overabundant wildlife or native species is outside the scope of this programme. However, we may consider projects that target native species that are exotic to a particular part of Australia and pose a threat to the ecosystem, habitat or native species in those part(s) of Australia, and have a national impact on agricultural productivity and profitability.

Refer to the programme guidelines for detailed eligibility and assessment criteria.

11. How will applications be assessed?

We will first check all applications for eligibility and to ensure that the application form has been fully completed. We will submit all eligible applications to an assessment panel for merit assessment.

The assessment panel will provide us a recommendation. We will then advise the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources on the merits of each eligible application. The Minister will decide on the projects to be funded.

12. When will I know the outcome of my application?

Pending Ministerial approval, we expect to be able to inform you of the outcome of our process in April–May 2017.

13. When can the project activities start?

If your application is approved, you can start your project activities once a grant agreement is signed between the successful applicants and the Australian Government. This is expected to happen around May 2017.

14. Is there a time limit on the project?

Funding for the programme is available until June 2019. However, we recognise that control tools and technologies can take many years to develop. Therefore, some projects that propose to extend beyond June 2019 may be considered. You will need to demonstrate your ability to deliver on the early outcomes of the project, which contribute to progressing the development of the proposed control tool or technology, before the end of the programme on 30 June 2019.

Each project will be assessed on the benefits of extension beyond June 2019, against any potential risks, on a case by case basis. This includes if there is evidence of an ongoing funding commitment from the applicant and/or project partners after 2018–19. For these types of projects, the department will reach an agreement with successful applicants on how the project progress will be monitored beyond June 2019 and include this in the grant agreement.

15. How can I apply?

​ We strongly recommend reading the programme guidelines carefully before applying.

16. Who owns the Intellectual Property (‘IP’)?

If your application is successful, you must sign a grant agreement with the Australian Government before you can receive the funding.

The agreement is based on the standard Commonwealth low-risk grant agreement. You should also read the Commonwealth General Grant Conditions, including those relating to intellectual property before submitting an application.

17. Are monitoring, detection, surveillance and/or identification tools or technologies for the control of established pest animals and weeds eligible?

These projects are within scope of the programme. However, applications will only be eligible if they address all eligibility criteria – applicants should refer to parts 6 and 7.1 of the programme guidelines carefully in addressing whether their proposals meet the eligibility criteria.

18. Are projects proposing to develop a methodology or strategy to control established pest animals and weeds eligible?

These projects are not within scope of the programme, because methodologies and strategies are not biological, chemical or physical control tools or technologies. Such projects may be within scope if they also include the development of a new or improved biological, chemical or physical control tool or technology. Applicants should refer to part 7.1 of the programme guidelines carefully in addressing whether their proposals meet the project eligibility.