Transcript of Future Farming Forum event at Wagga Wagga, NSW

​This three and a half minute video was produced to communicate the opportunities for the farming sector during the Future Farming Forum held in Wagga Wagga. Some of the country’s leading agricultural researchers highlighted key findings from a range of projects that will help farmers and graziers  adapt to our variable climate.

Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry
Transcript – Future Farming Forum in Wagga Wagga Video (Final) – Riverina producers hear from the experts on the latest climate change research and techniques

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Future Farming Forum at Wagga Wagga, NSW [3:23] 

14 June 2012

Transcript

  1. Voice Over:
    Primary producers from the Riverina received a unique insight into the future challenges and opportunities for the farming sector during the Future Farming Forum held recently in Wagga Wagga. Some of the countries leading agricultural researchers highlighted key findings from a range of projects that will help farmers and graziers  adapt to our variable climate. Guest speaker Phil Graham from the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries talked to attendees about the results from the Southern Livestock Adaptation project.

    Mr Phil Graham, Technical Specialist, Grazing systems, NSW DPI:
    On the livestock side, Phil made the comment about “if we're looking into the future the only way to do it is modelling. Whether people like models or don't like models there's no way of going from now to 2030 or 2050 without using a model, and that’s a fact of life”. The model we've used is one called ‘Grass-gro’ — it first came out in about the mid-90s.

  2. Voice Over:
    Michael Cashen, Warwick Badgery and Phil Bowden all from the New South Wales DPI also spoke at the Future Farming Forum.

    Mr Michael Cashen, Agricultural Climatologist, NSW DPI:
    You know, have a bit of a look at historic climate for this area. Okay we look at temperature, rainfall records going back as far back as far as we've got them, that they’re accurate, and looking for trends in that data.

    Mr Warwick Badgery, Research Agronomist, NSW DPI:
    I’ll talk about calculating soil carbon stores. So how you calculate the amount of soil carbon you've got in your soil. I'll give a background of some of the projects we've been running in central New South Wales, then I’ll start talking about those influences on soil carbon, climate soil type, land use and management and then finish up with some potential rates of change if you're moving from one land use to another one.

  3. Voice Over:
    Prime lamb and cereals producer, Ralph Gebhardt from Harden NSW, said the forum provided an opportunity to hear the results of research conducted locally.

    Mr Ralph Gebhardt, Prime Lamb and Cereals Producer, Harden, NSW:
    I guess today has given us an opportunity to look at the broader picture with regards to climate and its effect on agriculture, and we have to look more closely at our production systems, and not be complacent about any of those issues. We do have a lot of scope at our disposal in order to be able to deal with climate change and we should just gradually start to implement those over time as we’ve tested those. I think we should be able to handle climate change as we have in the past really, over the last 30 years, we've been adapting to climate change. We’ve probably been unaware of what we've been doing but now it has a slightly more heightened focus and we have a lot more valuable information to draw on.

  4. Voice Over:
    The Wagga Wagga Forum was just one of a number held nationally in 2011 and 2012 to demonstrate that changing management strategies can have real and lasting benefits on the productivity and profitability of farms across the country.

    The Australian Government’s Climate Change Research Program is a significant research effort aimed at providing practical solutions for our primary industries to adapt to the changing climate.

    The CCRP has laid the vital groundwork for further research, demonstration and extension that will now occur through the Australian Government’s $429 million Carbon Farming Futures program.

    This event was supported by funding and in-kind support from the following partners:

    Meat & Livestock Australia
    NSW Department of Primary Industries

    END