Transcript of Townsville PIARN event

​This four minute video was produced to communicate about The Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network (PIARN) Master Class held in Townsville. This group of researchers, farmers, consultants and policymakers in primary industries visited Townsville to learn about the impact of climate change on the beef, sugar and horticulture industries in the region.

Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry
Transcript – PIARN Townsville Video (Final) Up-and-coming leaders in climate change and agriculture visit Townsville.

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Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network (PIARN) Master Class in Townsville, QLD  [4:06]  

Transcript

 17 July 2012

  1. Voice Over:
    A group of researchers, farmers, consultants and policymakers in primary industries visited Townsville recently to learn about the impact of climate change on the beef, sugar and horticulture industries in the region.

    The Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network (PIARN) Master Class focused on understanding how primary industry can adapt to changes in climate, respond to significant weather events, and work in harmony with significant ecosystems.

    As part of the Master Class, participants spent a day at the CSIRO Lansdown research station; one of five national demonstration sites established through the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry’s Climate Change Research Program.

    Master Class participants heard from key researchers at the Lansdown site including CSIRO’s Dr Ed Charmley, research program leader at Lansdown, and social scientist Dr Nadine Marshall.

    Dr Nadine Marshall, Social Scientist, CSIRO:
    What is social vulnerability? So certainly people who are vulnerable to change might not be in a position to absorb and adapt to change. I'd like to just touch on different definitions. What are we looking for then? And then giving some figures. How vulnerable is the Northern Grazing System? I work across cattle, fisheries and farming and it's really nice to see how diverse this group is. Normally there’s only one type in the room for me, so that’s great. Thirdly, I'd like to talk about ‘thresholds in coping’ because that’s something that we often talk about when we're talking about adapting to change.

  2. Voice Over:
    Dr Charmley provided an overview of the Lansdown research site and the Reducing Emissions from Livestock Research Program, which is funded by DAFF as part of the CCRP.

    Dr Ed Charmley, Research Leader, CSIRO:
    We do have lots of data now to demonstrate that we are in a warming trend and, of course, livestock are considered a source of greenhouse gases, and cattle, as they produce methane. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and they’re being targeted, I guess, as a source of methane. And it's somewhere around four per cent of the total emissions, based on DCCEE estimates. We would like to get the national emissions, because this is just to demonstrate that Australia is by no means one standard paddock, it’s extremely variable.

  3. Voice Over:
    Participants toured the Lansdown site and the methane measurement chambers to understand the system from chamber to paddock scale. Dr Charmley said that correlating the more accurate data from the chambers with the very relevant data that can be gathered in portable tents, smart tags and collars and paddock wide technologies such as open-path lasers, will enable researchers to better understand the conditions for methane production and provide methane reducing opportunities.

    Dr Ed Charmley, Research Leader, CSIRO:
    In the next 20 to 30 years there will be opportunities to see some fairly marked improvements in emissions through anti-methanogenic technologies through improved animal productivity.

    Linda Hygate, Master class participant:
    I’ve really enjoyed mixing and meeting with other people and learning about the different challenges that have occurred across the country with respect to climate change adaptation, and particularly seeing some of the activities in action.

    Pete Melville, Master class participant:
    The Master Class gave me a good opportunity to look at what's happening cross-sectionally across Australia from travelling through the Eyre Peninsula up to the Northern Tropics we've been able to see not only what's happening on the farms themselves but what's required for climate adaptation to occur.

  4. Voice Over:
    The Australian Government’s Climate Change Research Program is a significant research effort aimed at providing practical solutions for our primary industries to adapt to the changing climate.

    The CCRP has laid the vital groundwork for further research, demonstration and extension that will now occur through the Australian Government’s $429 million Carbon Farming Futures program.

    This program was supported by funding and in-kind support from the following partners:

    Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network (PIARN)
    National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF)

     

    END