Transcript of Climate Champions event

​This five minute video was produced to communicate about the Climate Champions program. Through this program, farmers work with scientists and industry to provide relevant tailored information, research results and adaptation options for agriculture. This group of farmers who are at the forefront of their industries commit their own time and networks to contribute to managing climate risk.

Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry
Climate Champions Video (Final) – Farmers and scientists connect in Canberra for climate talks

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Climate Champions workshop held in Canberra  [4:50]  

Transcript

 17 July 2012

  1. Voice Over:
    More than 30 of Australia's most progressive farmers are members of the Climate Champions program, an initiative of the Managing Climate Variability Program and Grains Research and Development Corporation, looking at climate risk management. Through this program, these farmers work with scientists and industry to provide relevant tailored information, research results and adaptation options for agriculture. This group of farmers who are at the forefront of their industries commit their own time and networks to contribute to managing climate risk. The Climate Champions, at their workshop held in Canberra, were able to hear firsthand and ask candid questions of scientists who are working on climate projects including the Climate Change Research Program. Leading climate and agricultural scientists including Dr Peter Hayman, Associate Professor Richard Eckard, Professor Snow Barlow, together with Ms Maya Stuart-Fox from the Australian Government Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency, met with this group and shared their insights. Every Climate Champion workshop includes a farm tour with the Canberra schedule including a visit to Pele Cannon’s family’s beekeeping enterprise at Urila.

    Ms Pele Cannon, Bee keeper, ‘Urila’ Canberra I just wanted to sort of, get a really in-depth understanding of the change processes that these people have been through.

    Pele’s Mother, Mrs Cannon: A little bit of honey will drop into the reducer, that is heated, and that separates that honey from the wax.

    Mr Mark Hannemann, Mixed farming producer, Cleve, SA:
    At farm visits you know, you're always going onto someone's property. I was speaking to Peter Whip, and he was telling me about how he has bores going down 1200 m, well that's colossal and hard for me to even comprehend. And then when the water comes out 70°C — well, you know, to go visit that and see different issues around Australia is just huge for us.

    Mr Simon Wallwork, Mixed farming producer, Corrigin,WA:
    I suppose I’m pretty focused on data-to-date in terms of the transient rainfall and frost and temperature and things like that, and try and help my farming peers in my local area get some of this information. For example, I took a group of farmers to the Bureau of Met(eorology) late last year and there we met with some climatologists and did a tour of the bureau. But we were presented with some data that showed us the trends in rainfall and for our area is quite clear it's been decreasing. I also work with the local grower group and we do in-paddock trials. Recently we’ve been focusing on improving our moisture efficiency because that's obviously pretty important to adapt to decreasing rainfall. So I try and tackle the practical things that can help us adapt to climate change.

  2. Voice Over: These farm visits offer a unique opportunity for the climate champions to gain a greater understanding of how local farmers are managing climate variability on their own enterprises.

    Ms Andrea Hannemann, Mixed farming producer, Cleve, SA:
    We speak at forums. Like the NRM board will put on a ‘water security’ forum, so they’ll ask us and we’ll get up there and talk about the project we have on our farm that we think is quite innovative — that’s our water harvesting system. So we get up there and we talk about that, because we know it very well and we've had the journey. And then we, as an extension, talk about the Climate Champion program and what we've learnt. And every time we meet, every time we talk to anybody on the program, we learn stuff, we talk to researchers. So we are becoming a real conduit between the researchers and the farmers.

    Mr Simon Wallwork, Mixed farming producer, Corrigin,WA:
    Probably the best bit is the people involved. We are sort of like-minded people from all around Australia. We are trying to do our best in sometimes difficult circumstances and I think we motivate each other by being a part of this program and obviously being armed with information that we can take back to our local area is also a good thing about the program.

    Ms Andrea Hannemann, Mixed farming producer, Cleve, SA:
    We’ve almost formed a family; like when we come back now it's so lovely to see each other, and every conversation we have with each other we’re actually learning. We never stop learning and it's a very inspiring place to be and every conversation you learn something. Sometimes in farming, you know, you have your down days and you have not so good moments and it's really nice to be surrounded in inspiring company.

  3. Voice Over:
    Climate Champions work alongside the scientific community advising researchers about what farmers need to manage climate risk.
  4. Voice Over:
    The Climate Champion program is supported by Managing Climate Variability, which is a collaborative program between the Grains, Rural Industries & Sugar Research & Development Corporations, and Meat & Livestock Australia, Grains Research & Development Corporation.
END