Transcript of Canberra PIARN event

​This four minute video was produced to communicate the experience with 20 young researchers, farmers, consultants and policymakers in the Primary Industries during a Master Class held recently in Canberra.  PIARN convener, leading agricultural scientist, Professor Snow Barlow, explained the program brings Australia’s future leaders in agriculture face-to-face with those who are making the decisions and developing the adaptation strategies now.

Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry
Transcript – PIARN Canberra Video (Final) – Next generation of leaders in agriculture learn from chief climate change scientists in Canberra Master Class

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Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network Master Class - Canberra  [4:00]  

Transcript

 17 July 2012

  1. Voice Over:
    Some of Australia's most influential climate change scientists spent time sharing their knowledge and experience with 20 young researchers, farmers, consultants and policymakers in the Primary Industries during a Master Class held recently in Canberra. . The Primary Industries Adaptation Research Network (PIARN) Master Class focused on understanding how Primary Industries can adapt to expected changes in the climate and the links between research, government policy and farmers.

    PIARN convener, leading agricultural scientist, Professor Snow Barlow, explained the program brings Australia’s future leaders in agriculture face-to-face with those who are making the decisions and developing the adaptation strategies now.

    Professor Snow Barlow, Chair in Food Production Horticulture, University of Melbourne:
    We are seeking to provide some strong knowledge base to farmers that they can begin to adapt to climate change and begin to look at ways in which they might reduce the greenhouse gas intensity of their products. So what our job  is to provide a solid research base that they can integrate into their current and future systems to achieve adaptation to climate change, and also reduce the emissions intensity of their production.

  2. Voice Over:
    The three-day Master Class programme in Canberra involved presentations from leading scientists such as climate change expert Dr Mark Howden from the CSIRO and Associate Professor Dr Richard Eckard from Melbourne University. Phil Graham from New South Wales DPI discussed the importance of the use of modelling when developing climate change strategies.

    Phil Graham, Technical Specialist, Grazing systems, NSW DPI, Yass:
    “If we're looking into the future the only way you can do it is modelling. Whether people like models or don't like models, there's no way of going to now to 2030 or 2050 without using a model, and that’s a fact of life”.

  3. Voice Over:
    To gain an appreciation of action on the ground the Master Class visited John Ive’s property ‘Talaheni’. John and his wife Robyn run the 250 hectare family farm in Murrumbateman, specialising in ultra fine wool production, Angus cattle and farm forestry.
     
    Mr John Ive, Mixed Farmer, ‘Talaheni’ Murrumbateman, NSW:
    We’ve had this place now coming up to 35 years. We had serious challenges when we first bought. The most obvious and serious one was severe dry land salinity. Something like 23 per cent of the place was active saline seeps and with that came secondary erosion, loss of pasture, and then subsequently  we realised that we also had a very acid soil.
  4. Voice Over:
    The Ives began measuring a range of critical environmental factors to their farming operation 30 years ago and as a result have greatly improved their understanding of the climatic and pasture growth cycles on their property, and have been better able to predict and manage changing seasonal conditions.

    John Ive addresses the attendees:
    The elements we measure are obviously rainfall, we measure run-off and that’s why we were going to go up there……

  5. Voice Over:
    During the tour of the Ives property, Master Class participants were given the opportunity to look at John's soil moisture monitoring sites where John explains the importance of soil moisture management in achieving environmental and production objectives.

    John Ive addresses the attendees:
    The soil then is available for evaporation and transpiration.  You get a build up in the soil moisture,  if that is exceeded it goes through the bottom, you get deep drainage and that's what's the cause of dry land salinity.

  6. Voice Over:
    John also discussed the soil water balance model he has developed to assist in timing pasture establishment, tree planting, grazing & saline water-table management.                 
  7. Voice Over:
    The Australian Government’s Climate Change Research Program is a significant research effort aimed at providing practical solutions for our primary industries to adapt to the changing climate.

    The CCRP has laid the vital groundwork for further research, demonstration and extension that will now occur through the Australian Government’s $429 million Carbon Farming Futures program.

    This program was supported by funding and in-kind support from the following partners:

    Primary Industry Adaptation Research Network (PIARN)
    National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF)

    END