About my region – Ballarat Victoria

About my region is a series of individual profiles of the agricultural, forestry and fisheries industries in your region. This regional profile presents an overview of the agriculture, fisheries, and forestry sectors in the Ballarat region and the recent financial performance of the Victorian broadacre, dairy, and vegetable industries.

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Regional overview

The Ballarat region is located in the south west of Victoria (refer to land use map below). The region comprises the four local government areas of Ballarat, Central Goldfields, Hepburn and Pyrenees, and parts of the Ararat, Golden Plains, Loddon, Moorabool, and Mount Alexander local government areas. The region incorporates the major regional centre of Ballarat. The region covers a total area of around 10,288 square kilometres or 4.5 per cent of Victoria's total area and is home to approximately 146,200 people (ABS 2011).

Agricultural land in the Ballarat region occupies 6,534 square kilometres, or 63 per cent of the region. Areas classified as conservation and natural environments (nature conservation, protected areas and minimal use) also occupy 1,015 square kilometres, or 10 per cent of the region. The most common land use by area is grazing modified pastures, which occupies 4,878 square kilometres or 47.4 cent of the Ballarat region.

Broad land use in the Ballarat region
Shows a map of broad land use in the Ballarat region. It includes a legend which shows the broad land use categories— nature conservation, protected areas and minimal use; grazing native vegetation; production forestry; grazing modified pastures; plantation forestry; cropping; horticulture; intensive uses and water. This map is discussed in the above paragraph.
Source: Land use of Australia 2010–2011 ABARES 2016

Employment

Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data from the February 2017 Labour Force Survey indicate that around 77,900 people were employed in the Ballarat region. The region accounts for 3 per cent of total employment in Victoria and 10 per cent of all people employed in the Victorian agriculture, forestry and fishing sector.

Health care and social assistance was the largest employment sector with 13,000 people, followed by agriculture, forestry and fishing with 8,800 people, representing about 11 per cent of the region's workforce. Manufacturing was the third largest employment sector with 7,100 people. Other important employment sectors in the region were accommodation and food services, retail trade and construction.

Employment profile, Ballarat region, February 2017
Shows the number of people employed in the Greater Adelaide region by industry in thousands. The figure is discussed in the previous two paragraphs.
Note: Annual average of the preceding 4 quarters
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, cat. no. 6291.0, Labour Force, Australia 2017

Agricultural sector

Value of agricultural production

In 2014–15, the gross value of agricultural production in the Ballarat region was $447 million, which was 3 per cent of the total gross value of agricultural production in Victoria ($13.1 billion).

The Ballarat region has a diverse agricultural sector. The most important commodities in the region (refer to figure below) based on the gross value of agricultural production were sheep and lambs ($120 million), followed by potatoes ($59 million) and wool ($55 million). These commodities together contributed 53 per cent of the total value of agricultural production in the region. In 2014–15 the Ballarat region accounted for 49 per cent ($59 million) of the total value of Victoria's potato production.

Value of agricultural production, Ballarat region, 2014–15
Shows the gross value of agricultural production in the region in millions of dollars. The figure is discussed in the previous three paragraphs.
Note: The graph shows only data published by the ABS. Some values were not published by the ABS to ensure confidentiality.
The "Other commodities" category includes the total value of commodities not published as well as those with small values.
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, cat. no. 7503.0, Value of agricultural commodities produced, Australia 2016

Number and type of farms

ABS data indicate that in 2014–15 there were 1,151 farms in the Ballarat region with an estimated value of agricultural operations of $5,000 or more. The region contains 4 per cent of all farm businesses in Victoria.

Number of farms, by industry classification, Ballarat region, 2014–15
Industry classificationBallarat regionVictoria
Number of farms% of RegionNumber of farmsContribution of region to state total %
Sheep Farming (Specialised)30726.62,98710.3
Grain-Sheep or Grain-Beef Cattle Farming20517.82,1609.5
Beef Cattle Farming (Specialised)19717.17,7402.5
Sheep-Beef Cattle Farming1099.51,4157.7
Vegetable Growing (Outdoors)1049.056618.4
Other Grain Growing907.82,9393.1
Other13912.18,7631.6
Total agriculture 1,15110026,5714.3

Note: Estimated value of agricultural operations $5,000 or more.
Industries that constitute less than 1 per cent of the region's industry are not shown
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Farms in the table above are classified according to the activities that generate most of their value of production. Sheep farms (307 farms) were the most common, accounting for 27 per cent of all farms in the Ballarat region, and 10 per cent of all sheep farms in Victoria.

Estimated value of agricultural operations (EVAO) is a measure of the value of production from farms and a measure of their business size. Around 41 per cent of farms in the Ballarat region had an EVAO of less than $50,000. These farms accounted for only 5 per cent of the total value of agricultural operations in 2014–15. In comparison, 11 per cent of farms in the region had an EVAO of more than $500,000 and accounted for an estimated 58 per cent of the total value of agricultural operations in the Ballarat region in 2014–15.

Distribution of farms by estimated value of agricultural operations, Ballarat region, 2014–15
Shows share of farms and share of value of agricultural operations in the Greater Adelaide region. The figure is discussed in the previous paragraph.
Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Farm financial performance

Estimates of financial performance are available for all broadacre, beef, sheep, grains, dairy and vegetable farms in Victoria.

Forestry sector

In 2010–11, the most recent year for which regional data are available, the total plantation area in the Ballarat region was approximately 22,800 hectares, comprised of approximately 8,700 hectares of hardwood plantations and 14,100 hectares of softwood plantations. The main hardwood species planted is blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) and the main softwood species planted is radiata pine (Pinus radiata).

In 2011, there were approximately 252,700 hectares of native forests in the Ballarat region, comprised mainly of Eucalypt medium open (177,800 hectares), Eucalypt medium woodland (33,400 hectares) and Eucalypt tall open (17,600 hectares) forest types. The majority of the native forests are multiple-use public forest available for timber production (120,100 hectares), approximately 69,700 hectares are privately managed and approximately 56,100 hectares are in nature conservation reserves (refer to figure below). Major timber processing industries are located at Beaufort and Ballarat, all of which are sawmills.

In 2013–14, the total plantation area in Victoria was approximately 433,100 hectares, comprised of approximately 206,000 hectares of hardwood plantations and 226,000 hectares of softwood plantations and 1,100 hectares of other plantations. The main hardwood species planted is blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus), and the main softwood species planted is radiata pine (Pinus radiata).

In 2014–15, the volume of native hardwood logs harvested was 1.3 million cubic metres valued at $109 million. The volume of plantation hardwood logs harvested was 2.8 million cubic metres valued at $197 million. The volume of softwood harvested was 3.9 million cubic metres valued at $280 million.

Total sales and service income in the Victorian forest and wood product industry was estimated at approximately $6.1 billion in 2013–14, of which $3.6 billion was from the sale of paper and paper products, and the remaining $2.6 billion was generated from other wood product sales.

In 2011, the Victorian forestry sector employed 21,826 workers (0.9 per cent of the total employed workforce in Victoria) compared with 23,672 (1.1 per cent) in 2006. The number of people employed includes forestry support services and timber wholesaling.

Areas of native forest, by tenure, Victoria
Shows areas of native forest, by tenure, in Victoria. The figure is discussed in the previous paragraph.
Source :ABARES Australia's State of the Forests Report 2013

References

ABS 2011, Census of Population and Housing, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Canberra.

Last reviewed:
22 May 2017